Bank notes in the hands of the public - F3

Released
28 April 2017 03:00 p.m.
Next release
27 April 2018 03:00 p.m.
Source
Reserve Bank of New Zealand
Periodicity
Yearly
As at last Wednesday in March (NZ$ thousands)
$ Notes L.S.D ALL
Year $1 $2 $5 $10 $20 $50 $100 Total 10/- £1 £5 £10 £50 Total Total
1998 8,724 10,591 57,825 122,032 612,717 365,499 454,250 1,631,638 936 1,589 1,934 489 158 5,106 1,636,744
1999 8,696 10,547 62,083 125,910 717,265 373,723 532,451 1,830,675 936 1,589 1,933 489 158 5,105 1,835,780
2000 8,677 10,516 68,500 135,558 824,102 337,601 648,267 2,033,221 936 1,588 1,932 488 158 5,102 2,038,323
2001 8,665 10,491 76,004 160,982 986,444 348,110 776,808 2,367,504 936 1,588 1,930 488
158 5,100 2,372,604
2002 8,651 10,465 79,010 168,985 1,147,651 361,380 913,044 2,689,186 936 1,588 1,930 488
158 5,100 2,694,286
2003 8,637 10,441 83,783 162,339 1,069,459 411,840 953,793 2,700,292 936 1,588 1,930 488
158 5,100 2,705,392
2004 8,627 10,424 86,684 165,740 1,059,267 473,392 983,635 2,787,769 936 1,588 1,927 488
158 5,097 2,792,866
2005 8,617 10,408 90,515 182,830 1,212,228 519,159 1,045,589 3,069,346 936 1,588 1,925 488
158 5,095 3,074,441
2006 8,607 10,391 92,370 183,216 1,171,319 533,098 1,124,339 3,123,340 936 1,588 1,925 488
158 5,095 3,128,435
2007 8,594 10,371 95,457 190,779 1,188,267 611,374 1,204,678 3,309,520 936 1,588 1,925 488
158 5,095 3,314,615
2008 8,587 10,360 96,425 196,191 1,256,110 678,465 1,221,487 3,467,625 935 1,588 1,925 488
158 5,094 3,472,719
2009 8,578 10,343 100,464 181,860 1,206,726 798,199 1,411,509 3,717,679 935 1,588 1,925 488
158 5,094 3722,773
2010 8,572 10,332 105,182 182,527 1,265,309 952,156 1,406,332 3,930,410 935 1,588 1,925 488
158 5,094 3,935,504
2011 8,566 10,320 109,267 191,969 1,231,543 998,571 1,451,313 4,001,549 935 1,588 1,925 488
158 5,094 4,006,643
2012 8,558 10,310 112,341 186,076 1,219,346 1,047,381 1,504,419 4,088,431 935 1,588 1,924 488
158 5,093 4,093,524
2013 8,551 10,299 119,011 194,413 1,308,526 1,178,671 1,605,338 4,424,809 935 1,588 1,924 488
158 5,093 4,429,902
2014 8,545 10,291 122,426 195,303 1,185,474 1,379,722 1,700,767 4,602,528 935 1,588 1,924 488 158 5,093 4,607,621
2015 8,540 10,283 128,397 186,864 1,120,701 1,658,341 1,844,828 4,957,954 935 1,587 1,922 488 158 5,090 4,963,044
2016 8,536 10,277 138,507 199,225  1,156,213 1,970,371 2,008,217 5,491,345 935  1,587 1,922 488 158 5,090 5,496,434
2017 8,532 10,272 143,842 207,932 1,100,984 2,051,079 1,998,644 5,521,284 935 1,587 1,922 488 158 5,089 5,526,373

The Data: Coverage, Periodicity, and Timeliness

Coverage characteristics

Data are disseminated in thousands of New Zealand dollars for bank notes in the hands of the public. The table includes all bank notes currently in circulation. It includes the New Zealand dollar (NZ$) series, which began circulation on 10 July 1967, and L.S.D. notes (the currency that was in circulation prior to 10 July 1967) that remain in the hands of the public. The series start in 1968.

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (the central bank) has a legal monopoly over the right to issue currency. In New Zealand, the New Zealand dollar is legal tender. As monetary liabilities of the central bank, the currency generally acts as the unit of account (or numeraire) for New Zealand – i.e. contracts are generally denominated in New Zealand dollars and cents (although there is no legal obligation to do so).

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Periodicity

Annual

Timeliness

Data for Notes in the hands of the public is released in April each year.

Access by the public

Statistics release calendar

The "Statistics Release Calendar" provides a long-term plan of scheduled releases. It is updated and released on the first working day of the month.

Integrity

Dissemination of terms and conditions under which official statistics are produced, including confidentiality of individual responses

One of the Reserve Bank's key statutory obligations is to provide New Zealand's currency. The information in these tables is provided for reasons of public interest only.

Provision of information about revisions and advance notice of major changes in methodology

Provisional data are italicised. Data are deemed provisional when a series is under review. New data, or revised data, are in bold font. This applies to the summary table only and not excel files. Revisions are generally published when the table is next due to be updated and released. Should revisions need to be made more promptly, a special note is posted on the RBNZ website.

Quality

Dissemination of documentation on methodology and sources used in preparing statistics

Data are extracted from the RBNZ electronic system for recording movements (including new issues, re-issues and notes destroyed) in New Zealand currency.

Dissemination of statistics that support statistical cross-checks and provide assurance of reasonableness

The Reserve Bank of New Zealand (the central bank) has a legal monopoly over the right to issue currency and therefore the only provider of currency in New Zealand.

Bank notes

Since 10 July 1967, the currency in circulation in New Zealand is New Zealand dollars (NZ$) and cents. Initially, the bank notes in circulation were $1 (one dollar), $2 (two dollar), $5 (five dollar), $10 (ten dollar), $20 (twenty dollar), and $100 (one hundred dollar). The $50 (fifty dollar) note was introduced in 1983 and the $1 and $2 notes were replaced with coins in 1991.

Bank notes in the hands of the public represent all notes held outside the Reserve Bank vaults.

Prior to 10 July 1967, the currency in circulation in New Zealand was L.S.D. (pounds, shillings and pence). The notes, immediately prior to the introduction of the above decimal currency, were 10/- (ten shilling), ₤1 (one pound), ₤5 (five pound), ₤10 (ten pound), and ₤50 (fifty pound).

Legal tender

The virtue of cash - that you can buy or sell something instantly and conveniently - comes from the concept of legal tender. Technically, legal tender means that if I owe you money and I present you with cash, then the debt is cleared then and there. The only exception to this is if we both agree to a different form of payment beforehand. So, for example, a shop doesn't have to accept a cheque, and it doesn't even have to accept cash, but the shop has to clearly indicate to you before you do business with them that they do not accept these forms of payment.

There is a minor qualification to this, in that the law specifies limits on using annoying amounts of coins as legal tender for buying larger items. If I owe you, say, $1000, I can't present you with $1000 worth of 10 cent coins and require you to accept them as legal tender.

Reserve Bank notes and coins are defined in Section 27 of The Reserve Bank of New Zealand Act 1989, as "legal tender". The Reserve Bank is the only organisation in New Zealand that can issue bank notes and coins and determine the denominations and design of the nation's currency.

Symbols and conventions for summary table

0 Value rounded to zero
- Zero or not applicable
.. Not available
bold Revised/new
italics Provisional
light red background Historical

General notes

  • Individual figures may not sum to the totals due to rounding
  • Percentage changes are calculated on unrounded numbers
  • You are free to copy, distribute and adapt these statistics subject to the conditions listed on our copyright page.