Armistice Day coin FAQs

More information on the Armistice Day coin.

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Armistice Day (also sometimes referred to as Remembrance Day) marks the anniversary of the signing of the Armistice that ended WW1 and commemorates the sacrifice of those who died serving New Zealand in this and all wars and armed conflict.

The Great War of 1914 to 1918 was one of the most devastating events in human history. New Zealand, with a population of 1.1 million in 1914, sent 100,000 men and women abroad. 16,700 died and over 40,000 were wounded.

The coming of peace on the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918 brought relief for all involved.

On Armistice Day 1918, New Zealand had 58,129 troops in the field, while an additional 10,000 were under training in New Zealand. In total, the troops provided for foreign-service by New Zealand during the War represented 10% of its 1914 population between the ages of 20-45.

The signing of the Armistice is observed annually in New Zealand at 11am on 11 November (the 11th hour on the 11th day of the 11th month). Two minutes silence is observed in memory of those New Zealanders who died while serving their country.

2018 marks the 100th anniversary of the signing of the Armistice.

Source: NZDF website

On Armistice Day 1918, New Zealand had 58,129 troops in the field, while an additional 10,000 were training in New Zealand.

The Great War of 1914 to 1918 was one of the most devastating events in human history. New Zealand, with a population of 1.1 million in 1914, sent 100,000 men and women abroad. 16,700 died and over 40,000 were wounded.

2018 marks 100 years since the signing of the Armistice. The Bank is issuing this Armistice Day coin to commemorate the history, service, and sacrifice made by service personnel and their families to bring peace to New Zealand and the world.

This initiative supports the WW100 commemorations bringing education and awareness to Armistice Day.

The majority of the coins (approximately 1.6 million) will be released into circulation from 1 October. The coins will be distributed to New Zealand retailers throughout the country.

The coins have been distributed across New Zealand based on population and will be issued via retailers based on demand. This is the Bank’s usual distribution method. You may see one in your change.

The public will be able to order a limited number of coins through the NZ Post website from 3 September.

See the NZ Post website for more information.

The Reserve Bank distributes its coin through cash transport companies. The arrangements these companies have with their customers (retailers) are commercially sensitive and for that reason we do not have this information.

However, you can buy limited stocks through NZ Post website now.

Yes, we are working through those details now and more information will be available shortly.

Yes. It is a circulating coin and it is legal tender, so can use it as you would a standard 50 cent coin to pay for goods and services. However, you may choose to keep it as a way to remember the Armistice Day centenary.

Two million. This is double the number of circulating commemorative Anzac coins minted in 2015.

The Armistice Day coin design features the official Royal New Zealand Returned Services’ Association’s red poppy in the middle, surrounded by a free formed remembrance wreath that has incorporated the silver fern and koru as strong New Zealand elements. The printed silver ferns on the wreath represent the past, present and future and also reflect the three armed forces in New Zealand. The engraved koru pattern represents new beginnings, and the engraved silver fern reflects New Zealand’s national identity.

The Bank and NZ Post worked closely with New Zealand artist Dave Burke to create the Armistice Day coin design. The same artist also designed the 2015 circulating Anzac coin.

The coin design has been approved by the Reserve Bank and Her Majesty the Queen.

The coin was minted by the Royal Canadian Mint in Canada. The Royal Canadian Mint mints New Zealand’s regular 10, 20 and 50 cent coins.

The coin was minted by the Royal Canadian Mint. The coin is minted as usual, and then a special high-speed ‘pad printing’ process is used to stamp on the colour.

No. The Armistice Day coin is a one-off minting to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day.

Yes. The Armistice Day coin will have the same electromagnetic properties as the existing 50 cent coin, so no changes will be needed to machines. The coin has been tested to ensure it is compatible with coin-equipment.